Home > Politics > Jim Crow Makes a Come Back: Disenfranchisement Comes to Ohio.

Jim Crow Makes a Come Back: Disenfranchisement Comes to Ohio.

Republican Party (United States)

Image via Wikipedia

When the public grows tired of unpopular bills and the lawmakers that pass them, we either vote down the bill through referendum, and/or remove the law makers, right? Well, think again. 

Here in Ohio, the Republicans have delivered a one-two punch in their efforts to eliminate the two party system, and do away with that pesky Democracy. Not only have they attacked collective bargaining under the guise of a “deficit emergency,” they have also bum rushed a bill titled HB 159, which requires voters to show a state issued ID, military ID, or a U.S. passport in order to vote. The two movements are used in tandem under Republican Governors in order to ensure that  they pass can their corrupt bills with impunity. Furthermore, there are currently 21 other states either considering a similar bill, or in the process of passing it through their Republican dominated state legislatures. 

Rep. Bob Mecklenburg claims “the bill is necessary to combat voter fraud and the perception of fraud.” When asked to provide actual proof of voter fraud in Ohio, he channeled his best Donald Rumsfeld in declaring that “I believe it happens,” and “It’s impossible to prove a negative.”  Huh? 

The conservative pursuit if voter fraud is a ruse, nothing more. In the last 8 years of voting in Ohio, there were a total of 4 instances of voter fraud out of 9,078,728 cases, a whopping 0.00004%. My bullshit detector is running rampant! 

HB159 is a new version of the Jim Crow polling tax. Its purpose is to exclude nearly 900,000 Ohioans from voting, the majority of which are the elderly, disabled, low-income voters, students, and minorities. With the exception of the elderly, a majority of these people historically vote Democratic. Hmmmm, is anyone else making the connection here? 

Furthermore, this boonswaggle of a bill is going to cost Ohio somewhere in the neighborhood of $20 million dollars to implement. That’s some great budget repair Governor Kasich. 

This bill is not about voter fraud; it’s about disenfranchisement. Eliminate a great portion of the Democrats voter base, eliminate the Democratic Party. It’s that simple. It’s elitist discrimination at its best, and a brilliant strategy to keep the poor and middle class under the heels of the conservative jack boots. 

Once the Republican Party establishes their dream of a fascist, closed society, this is what we can look forward to; a country where we have no voice. We can look forward to a country where the government becomes firmly entrenched in a woman’s ovaries. We can look forward to a nation where if you aren’t a heterosexual white male between 21 and 65, with an income that reaches well into 6 figures, you don’t count. 

I can’t wait until the Republicans change our national motto to “In Koch we trust.”

Advertisements
  1. March 29, 2011 at 12:00 pm

    In the last 8 years of voting in Ohio, there were a total of 4 instances of voter fraud out of 9,078,728 cases, a whopping 0.00004%. My bullshit detector is running rampant!

    I agree that the number is vanishingly small. However, that doesn’t change the idea that we should protect the voting both.

    My position is that we should make sure voters are who they say they are. But, given it’s place on the list of priorities, it can wait until [much] later.

    We can look forward to a nation where if you aren’t a heterosexual white male between 21 and 65, with an income that reaches well into 6 figures, you don’t count.

    I would prefer that voting be extended to those that contribute a net positive in taxes. If you receive more money from the Federal Government than you pay in, no voting for you.

    requires voters to show a state issued ID, military ID, or a U.S. passport in order to vote.

    Don’t forget, you need ID to purchase Sudafed.

    And fish.

    Like

    • March 29, 2011 at 1:57 pm

      Hi Pino!

      I would agree that the voting booth needs protected; the last thing anybody wants is to return to the days of big city bosses, with voters returning from the grave to cast their ballots.

      However, I have to question the timing and severity of these measures, as well as the cost. From day one of the 2010 elections, the conservative cry was about jobs and the deficit, yet I have not seen a single piece of legislation on state or federal level that legitimately addresses either. This bill is going to cost tax payers in Ohio almost 20 million dollars to implement, how does that reduce the deficit?

      If voter fraud were rampant, I would agree with this bill, but fraud is not rampant. This is no different than the voter laws enacted a century ago in the Jim Crow south, that were designed to keep African Americans out of the voting booths and keep the whites in power. In fact a lot of the potential voters affected here are inner city African Americans who live below the poverty line, do not have proper ID, nor have a clue that they can get a state ID, if, you know, they could even afford one.

      I’m a little uneasy about the notion of voter eligibility being based upon what we pay in taxes. It’s a little too close to the old days, when we were required to own property in order to be considered a citizen.

      I get your point about Sudafed, and it has its merit. However, I would counter with making it harder to buy sudafed hasn’t stopped meth labs from operating by any measure, just as passing these voter fraud bills are going to stop the types of voter fraud that do manage to succeed.

      Like

      • March 29, 2011 at 11:49 pm

        However, I have to question the timing and severity of these measures, as well as the cost.

        Me too. Better things to spend time and money on.

        I’m a little uneasy about the notion of voter eligibility being based upon what we pay in taxes.

        So am I. I’m also uncomfortable with 51% of the folks deciding that the other 49% will pay for their lives.

        Like

  2. ojmo
    March 29, 2011 at 6:29 pm

    I’d be fascinated to know the machinations that led to all these Republican governors and state legislatures simultaneously developing identical laws attacking the working and middle classes.

    Like

  3. Kurt
    March 30, 2011 at 1:01 pm

    The days of the “southern strategy” are over, and new republican governors in the north want to keep it that way.

    Like

    • March 30, 2011 at 3:35 pm

      I don’t know, I would say they are still using the “Southern Strategy.” The hard right conservatives (AKA Tea Baggers) have no problem slamming every Democratic and moderate conservative political base in sight, in order to further their grass roots movement to get corporate lackeys like Walker and Kasich elected.

      The Southern Strategy of Nixon and Reagan is not dead; it’s merely taken a more dangerous form.

      Like

      • March 31, 2011 at 7:37 pm

        The hard right conservatives (AKA Tea Baggers)

        You say hard right conservatives in a context that makes it sound like a pejorative. Does there exist an equally hard left?

        And remember, the Tea Party really only takes a stand on financial issues. Though I do agree with you there stance on financial issues is very conservative.

        Like

        • April 1, 2011 at 8:12 am

          Nooooo political talk until Tuesday. I’m on vacation in Pigeon Forge, and I’m taking a break from all things political. 🙂

          Like

    • March 30, 2011 at 3:36 pm

      BTW, thanks for stopping by!

      Like

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: